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Bellingham High Student’s Actual Name is ‘Boston Strong’

By David Bloch | 09/15/2014
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Even though he didn’t grow up here, Michael Strong has been a huge Celtics fan since the 1980s – so much so that when his first son was born in 1996, he named him Boston. His first choice was actually Larry Bird Strong, but his wife Marianne “wasn’t having it.” The Strong family, originally from Utah, moved to Bellingham in July.

Boston had mixed emotions when his name became the most overused slogan ever after the Marathon bombings last year. According to the Milford Daily News, “the whole ordeal was a lot to wrap his head around.”

“Obviously I was very disappointed at what had happened at the Marathon. There were a lot of negative emotions involved. At the same time, it was a little bit exciting to see my name everywhere.”

He’s certainly had no shortage of things to talk about at his new school this month:

“When he first introduced himself in his new town, the results ran the gamut. ‘I did get a lot of varying reactions,’ said Strong, whose middle name is Michael.

‘Some people think it’s really awesome. Some react with disbelief.’ He said others ask if he changed his name after the events of April 2013.

Either way, it’s a conversation starter. That’s a bonus feature, especially at a new school.
‘I still have people I don’t know saying ‘Hi’ to me,’ admitted Strong.

‘I’ve been coaching for 22 years, so I have seen a lot of names,” said Peter Lacasse, his cross country coach. ‘This is the most unique, I think.”

Strong says he enjoys his name, but hopes he doesn’t become more well-known for it than his accomplishments:

Strong’s name tells a story, for sure, and now fate has brought it to a place on the map where it gets even more attention. He said he does own ‘a couple’ Boston Strong shirts. Still, Strong hopes that the name isn’t the only thing people take away from being around him.

‘I think I definitely would like to be recognized for the things I do,’ Strong said. ‘Not that I don’t appreciate the name, but I want my name to be appreciated for accomplishments as well.”

Read the full story here.